miscellaneous

I’ll come clean right now:  I don’t Tweet.  Much.  That said, I enjoy reading other people’s tweets (does this make me a freeloader?)

And I realized that I don’t follow all my Facebook friends on Twitter. I had a few minutes tonight so I thought I’d bop on over to Twitter to fix that.

I got there and found the “Find Friends” link.  There is a short list of services from which you can choose to import contacts.  You know who’s not on the list?  Facebook.

So, here’s a quick-and-dirty workaround.

You’ll need:

  • A Yahoo! Mail account
  • A Facebook account (with friends)
  • About 5 minutes (if that)

Here’s what you do:

  1. Go to your Yahoo! Mail contacts page.
  2. Click the “Import Contacts” button.
  3. Click “Facebook”.
  4. Click “Okay”, when it asks if you want to share with Yahoo!.
  5. Yahoo! Mail will import your Facebook contacts.
  6. Click the checkbox to select all of your contacts.
  7. IMPORTANT:  Click “Assign to Lists” – either create a new list or add to an existing list.*
  8. Go to the Find Friends page on Twitter.com.
  9. Click “Search Contacts” next to Yahoo!
  10. Click “Agree” to allow Twitter to access your Yahoo! Mail contacts.
  11. Pick and choose who to follow.

Hope this helps you out!  Feel free to comment if you have any questions.

* If you don’t do this, Twitter will not detect any contacts from your Yahoo! Mail account.  This is because Yahoo! marks all Facebook contacts as such and does not allow them to be exported until they’ve been modified in some way.

 

Bookshelf

Image via Wikipedia

Over the past while, I’ve been stewing over an idea for a novel.  I’m fascinated by it but I wonder if anybody else is.  Some close friends have said they find it interesting but I’d like to get the opinion of a wider audience.  If you wouldn’t mind, would you read the synopsis below and vote “Yes” or “No” if you think it sounds interesting to you?  Thanks!

Synopsis

Set at Stanford University in the early 70s, a young man and woman (she’s an undergrad, he’s a grad student) find themselves in love.  She’s a Mormon and he’s a Muslim.  As they go through their relationship and some unique and challenging complications, we see how both religions can alternately be used to solve problems, uplift and comfort as well as ostracize, humiliate and even terrorize.  We also explore the similarities shared between these two seemingly opposing religions.  Ultimately, we find that with a loving family and devotion to living principles that bring one closer to God, any challenge can be overcome, even ones caused by those closest to us.

I’m reading a great book right now called “Is God A Mathematician?” by Mario Livio.  It’s a fascinating book about whether mathematics is discovered or invented.  It’s a really interesting book (so far) and has really gotten me excited about math, again.

It got me thinking about how I was taught math and why I disliked math so much.  I remembered some of the things I learned and, for whatever reason, focused on the formula for the area of a circle:  (A = ?r2).

What I asked myself was, “why is that the formula of a circle?  Why, if you multiply the radius times itself and then times pi, some constant, do you get the area of the circle?”  After digging into this, I realized why I didn’t like math in school.

Continue Reading

Washington Crossing the Delaware
“Hurry!  One more fine, and
they close my account!”
Image by pittigliani2005 via Flickr

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8627835.stm

“The first president of the United States of America borrowed two books from the New York Society Library in 1789 but failed to return them.

Adjusted for inflation, he has since racked up $300,000 in fines for being some 220 years late.”